50to120 - Living Your Best, Healthy Senior Life

Senior Cyber - Best Security Practices for Seniors

August 17, 2021 Mark Burright Season 1 Episode 33
50to120 - Living Your Best, Healthy Senior Life
Senior Cyber - Best Security Practices for Seniors
Chapters
50to120 - Living Your Best, Healthy Senior Life
Senior Cyber - Best Security Practices for Seniors
Aug 17, 2021 Season 1 Episode 33
Mark Burright

Scott Schober joins Seniors50to120. Scott is CEO of Berkeley Vaitronics Systems in Metuchen, New Jersey to discuss his new book 'Senior Cyber'.

Scott is a highly sought after cybersecurity expert for media appearances and commentary as well as technical speaking engagements. Scott is also the author of several books about technology and cyber security. 

Recent media appearances include Bloomberg TV, CNN, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, NPR, CTV News, CCTV America, Fox Business Channel, Fox News, Al Jazeera America, Inside Edition, MSNBC, CNBC, The Blaze, OAN and many more. 

Scott continues to espouse the need for better cyber security practices through his appearances, speaking engagements, products and now his new book entitled Senior Cyber. 

 Scott and I will be discussing the basics of the Internet to the fight for privacy and security that is so critical for seniors. Scott offers simple advice and expertise for all levels of user experience. Whether you are a parent, grandparent, great grandparent or the son or daughter of one, this interview is designed with your concerns in mind. 

Scott also provides practical cybersecurity advice and examples affecting seniors. 

Show Notes Transcript

Scott Schober joins Seniors50to120. Scott is CEO of Berkeley Vaitronics Systems in Metuchen, New Jersey to discuss his new book 'Senior Cyber'.

Scott is a highly sought after cybersecurity expert for media appearances and commentary as well as technical speaking engagements. Scott is also the author of several books about technology and cyber security. 

Recent media appearances include Bloomberg TV, CNN, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, NPR, CTV News, CCTV America, Fox Business Channel, Fox News, Al Jazeera America, Inside Edition, MSNBC, CNBC, The Blaze, OAN and many more. 

Scott continues to espouse the need for better cyber security practices through his appearances, speaking engagements, products and now his new book entitled Senior Cyber. 

 Scott and I will be discussing the basics of the Internet to the fight for privacy and security that is so critical for seniors. Scott offers simple advice and expertise for all levels of user experience. Whether you are a parent, grandparent, great grandparent or the son or daughter of one, this interview is designed with your concerns in mind. 

Scott also provides practical cybersecurity advice and examples affecting seniors. 

Mark

Scott Shover joins seniors 50 to 120. Today Scott is the CEO of Berkeley viatronix systems in New Jersey. Scott is a highly sought after a cybersecurity expert for media appearances and commentary, as well as technical speaking engagements. Scott is also the author of several books about technology and cyber security. Recent media appearances include Bloomberg TV, CNN, good morning, America, CBS This Morning NPR, CVT news, CCTV America, Fox Business channel, Fox News inside edition, NBC, CNBC, the blaze and many more. Scott continues to expose the need for better cybersecurity practices through his appearances, speaking engagements, products, and now his new book entitled senior cyber, we'll be focusing on senior cyber today. 

Scott, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and how and why you got involved in the world of cybersecurity and wireless technology?

Scott

Yeah, absolutely. And great to be on here with you Mark. In the course of this discussion as a little background about myself. I grew up surrounded by technology. The business that I'm that I'm running now in Berkeley Varitronics Systems was founded by my father 49 years ago. So again, everything I did, since probably about sixth grade, when I really started getting to computers and heavily into gaming, pirating games, was always technology driven. And our company really focused on building out wireless test tools that that allow our cell phones to work, where to put the cell towers and all the different types of freaking frequencies that are that are used throughout the different deployments from second generation, the third generation to 4g LTE, where we are now the fifth generation where we're adding, that's really at the forefront of our business and our expertise. So we understand smartphones, what makes them work. But we also understand a lot of the ways that that can be exploited, the weaknesses, the vulnerabilities in wireless technology, and hence a lot of our education as a company is sharing information with other companies how they can stay safe from people that are trying to exploit the the wireless means. And in the process of doing that a number of years ago, what happened is I got a target on my back. In other words, the more I shared and educated people, and through speaking and writing and TV and radio interviews, the more the hackers started to go after me to to keep me quiet. And eventually it led to my company being targeted myself personally getting compromised and hacked, which later on in details in my first book hacked again, in short, they really got they got my my credit card, my debit card again and again, they shut down our website with repeated DDoS distributed denial of service attacks, they took over my Twitter account. And finally, he got my attention when they took $65,000 out of our checking account, and it became a federal investigation long and painful. Eventually, I got all my money back. But in the process of that I learned that even a security company that focuses on this day to day can be a target and can be victim I learned that nothing's 100% secure. But at the same time, I learned a lot of best practices and things that I can do as a business owner to keep my company safe, my employees safe. And all the companies we work with say. And that really kind of launched me more and more into the world of cyber security. And I think it really especially took off, probably, you know, 2013 2014 when target was first breach. That was kind of a turning point I noticed where I got really heavily involved in weighing in on a lot of these breaches what happened, what could have been done to prevent it. And that kind of launched me even further in the world of cyber, that I'm still in today.

Mark

 I know that seniors are really being targeted. So why is it important that seniors understand cybersecurity?

Scott

It's really important and what kind of motivated me to really focus on on seniors, a lot of people ask me that, and they said, Scott, you know, you could be writing books on cybersecurity is doing really well. And we've been very fortunate as far as a company and as far as the books, getting widespread adoption. And the second book I wrote was cybersecurity to everybody's businesses that it kind of migrated to a much larger audience now, where it does affect our, you know, our credit cards every day and getting hacked and personal information compromised, identity theft, ransomware all these different things. But But after the hack book, I noticed helping my parents who were both are aged. My mum, particularly dealing with different bouts of cancer makes it very hard to use technology effectively. And then my grandfather was 99 years at the time and has since passed, trying to aid him just to do basic things on the computer. It was a struggle, I spent a lot of time helping with password management and explaining things week after week. And I said, There's got to be a better source out there, there's some great videos or a book or something, and I started researching to find things to help them and I said, geez, there's nothing out there. And the few things that I did find, it kind of spoke down to seniors, it was intimidating, lots of jargon, hard to understand. And I said, This is not right. And at that point, I had kind of an aha moment, I said, I'm gonna focus on a boat that's tailored toward seniors, or those that are supporting seniors to help them so they could feel comfortable with the internet, computers, smartphones, and not be afraid of scammers and cyber criminals. And hence, that's kind of my quest to rate senior cyber. And so far, I'm very pleased I what's been received. And not just by seniors, but a lot of the caregivers, those that are trying to support maybe their elderly parents, their grandparents or what have you. It's been a nice resource. And what it's done is it's kind of it's opened up conversation. So when you're trying to support your parents or grandparents, it's not just about technology, it's more about conversations. Now you can use this book as a segue to start conversations and help them protect themselves protect their, their finances, protect their, their, their personal information on the internet. And so it's certainly been a joy. And it's a very different audience than writing to those that are very technical in nature in the field of cybersecurity.

Mark

Excellent stuff. Now, I been reading the seniors are likely to be targeted by cyber criminals for a lot of different reasons. Can you explain to us why these cyber criminals if you will do target seniors like they do?

Scott

Yeah. And that's a, it's kind of a surprise to me a number of years back, but the more research I did, and the more people I talked to it made logical sense. Why are seniors so targeted? A couple of reasons. Number one, they tend to be a little bit more trusting. Not always, but but they tend to be a little bit more trusting, which I think is important for us to all realize. And sometimes cybercriminals will play on that, especially when they're trying to socially engineer them out of personal information, be it through email, be it through phone scams, there's also a sense of innocence, that that seniors have, I think it's important, I also have financial means many seniors have worked hard, they have a hard work ethic. They've been through some tough times in the past, and they've learned to save so their, their median savings is higher than than your average person. Most people in the United States younger, have a level of debt. So is there a big target because they got money that could be taken. And sometimes also, I factor in, they have a little bit more time on their hands. not always the case. But some kind of times, especially if they're in assisted living facility or nursing home, they may be a little bit more lonely, they want to talk to people. So when that phone call comes over from a scammer when they receive something in the mail or email, they're more likely to read it, and more likely to respond. Even in the book. I share the analogy just with a phone. When we think about a phone and somebody that grew up when the phone first was introduced, many many decades back it was mounted on the wall, it was rotary. When that phone rang, what happens? Typically, someone in the household would walk over after two rings, it was polite to answer the phone. He would say Hello, this is the shoberg household. May I help you? Nowadays I look at my kids. Aren't we have actually a house phone? a landline phone if you could believe it? And nobody answers it. I don't know why we have it. Sometimes I will have smartphones. And it's strange. We everybody lets everything go to voicemail kind of pathetic. But if you think about cyber criminals, they knew their chances that senior actually answers the phone. If they're performing social engineering or scam or something. They have a much higher probability that they'll actually answer so many of these cyber criminals are actually targeting assisted living facilities. So if there's 1000 residents that live there, they're pretty good chance that they're going to have some level of success. Somebody's just waiting to pick up that phone and they can move through their scams. So there's a lot of different reasons and dynamics that seniors are targeted, but those are a few of the standouts for me,

1

Speaker 1

9:50

got it got it. That kind of leads us into my next question, how has the development of the telephone affected the development of technology and The scammers that are out there,

2

Speaker 2

10:03

the phone has certainly changed. And I look at the phone. And again, since we're so heavily invested our company in smartphones and the advanced the technology, I'm amazed at it. But at the same time, I'm also disappointed in the technology, that we really started a lot of our pioneering work in 8687 1986 1987 as a company, so pretty long time ago, and actually work on developing some of the standards for which mobile phones work. And it's amazing that they work so well, and that they now do so many things. I often refer to a smartphone, it's a Swiss Army knife, who uses it to make phone calls anymore? Really, people use it now for for texting and emojis. And, you know, that's your music that you check your weather you send your email, you can open up PDFs, and documents and the camera systems, you know, how many cameras does a smartphone have now? 345. It's unbelievable what you could do. So truly, it's become like a Swiss Army knife. I think some people have even been quoted that you can pretty much take anything away from them and like just don't take away their smartphone. And there's some truth to that, because people are so glued to it, especially now that we're starting to perform digital payments, right. And I certainly use Apple Pay, and I've kind of acclimated to that system there. And then ecosystem is very important. So when you think about how dependent all of us are on technology, and especially our smartphones, I think the world is now starting to change. And it also changes the playbook how cyber criminals work. In other words, they used to now target our computers, our desktop computers, people are migrating away from that, then they targeted laptops, and they were targeting our iPads now they're really migrating over to our mobile phones. And unfortunately, most of us are not always thinking about cybersecurity, we think about our mobile phone. Most people don't have apps on their phone to prevent malware and viruses keyloggers, things like that, do you have anti keylogging software on your mobile phone, the average person doesn't I use those things to the average person doesn't I notice. So those are prime targets that data can be exploited for whether you're a senior or any of us. So it's really important that we're cautious when using our smartphones and mobile devices, what websites we visit, what links we click on in the emails, because oftentimes, those are conduits to download malware, and cause us endless havoc.

1

Speaker 1

12:35

So when you get an email, and you don't know who that email is from, should you open it? What's your How should you handle that?

2

Speaker 2

12:44

You should never Well, number one, you probably will open it indirectly. Because if you open up your your email program, it may pop it up, but it's really the file the attachment that's in your email, okay, or the link that's in there is what you don't want to click. So if there's a link in there, and you click on it, it could immediately download particular strain of malware, which is malicious software, that could be a form of ransomware, or something else that can really cause havoc to your computer, encrypt all the files. There are also links that are embedded in these phishing emails, that will actually be a redirect to another website. So if it's, you know, bank XYZ that you bank at, and it looks very familiar in your email, you click on that. And maybe they have a ruse, and it says, Hey, we're checking security, we want to verify information to make sure your account is secure. There's some suspicious activity, please click here to verify who you are, and make sure that nobody takes your money or something and you're like, Oh, no, my account might be compromised. Let me click on here redirects you now to that, that other website that looks legit, because they copied all the graphics, the font, the look the spelling, but really, it's just a slight variation in the actual URL, the actual name that goes up in the browser, and that fools you and all they do is ask some basic questions, and they may even fool especially the senior by giving you some information that looks like they know who you are. Okay, you're john smith, last four digits, your social security number are 1234 you live at this address and suddenly say, Well, of course it must be legitimate, they know information about me, but that's because they socially engineered it or bought it on the dark web and fool you. And then they usually want to ask you just one more piece of information please verify your account number or your last transaction something that they can now use to perform identity theft a hack hack into your bank account, compromise your credentials, whatever the case may be. So for all those reasons, be really cautious to be able to suspicious email and the tells are always I saw I had a bunch of them this morning. I was laughing at dear sir the If they don't know my name, it's not addressed to me get rid of it. If there's anything that looks a little suspicious, and I go, I literally hover over the actual email address who it's from, right and look at the raw header files. Now, the average person probably doesn't do that to see the origin of the IP address, and so forth. But if you do basic investigation, if you weren't expecting this email, you're not sure who it's from, or what it's about, stop, pick up the phone, phone a friend, you can always make a phone call to your bank and say, Hey, did you just send me this email asking for further information in my accounts compromised? Physically call the phone number or go into your browser and physically enter your bank. Proper URL website address, so you can go there as opposed to clicking inside of a phishing email. I love to share this statistic. Why are these phishing emails still around? Despite all the junk filters and spam filters and things done at the server level? It's because they work every single day over 80,000 people fall victim and click on the attachment inefficient email that dispenses a malware attack. That is tremendous amount of success when you think about what is the cost of sending email these days, right? Nothing, it's your time, right for cyber criminals. And they're dispensing hundreds of millions of spam emails each and every day, just looking for those few unsuspecting trusting individuals to click on. So it really does work. So be really careful about clicking on anything in an email.

1

Speaker 1

16:34

Okay, now, this leads me into the next question as well. You talked about malware URLs, all kinds of different expressions that can be confusing to seniors, including myself, I'm 65. And my wife is 70. And my wife, I'm sorry, my mother is 86. So these expressions can be really confusing. Can you explain some of the expressions that seniors really need to understand?

2

Speaker 2

17:03

Yeah, absolutely. And in fact, that's one of the things that was a really a standout in my mind, because I sat down and actually talked to seniors interviewed seniors, asking them basic questions about cybersecurity, really, to get a pulse on what their knowledge base was, there was a level of familiarity with different terms, because they heard it on TV. But something as simple as www before, you know, and your particular URL there to go to a website, the World Wide Web, most people didn't understand what that was, or when you said the term, if I said the term malware, malicious software, they didn't understand that. So in the book, as I approach any subject, and then mention a term for the first time, actually stop and define, which is a little bit different. So I break it down. And I try not to use too many cybersecurity acronyms. It's hard to write a book with about cybersecurity and tips without it, so you have to do it. But and then the other thing I tried to do is actually break it down and share things that they can actually make an association to help them remember. So if I'm talking about the term cookies, for example, which are simple tracking codes that websites use to remember the product that you browse about, or make a corollary to that is something that they can remember in life, and they be like, oh, like a real literal cookie. So I think making those connections help when the reader goes through it. So they don't feel overwhelmed with this technical jargon. Because to me, that could turn you off even myself, if I if I'm reading something, and it's too technical, or if I'm just trying to learn something, it may turn me off. So I think really spend time defining these acronyms in tech jargon throughout the processes is really an important facet. The other thing is I actually develop a separate booklet. Yeah, actually, I have to say, it's fantastic. I got to throw that in there. Go ahead. I was just gonna say in trying to maybe demystify some of these terms and acronyms with a crossword puzzle and word search and things just to again, help a senior, let it sink in and understand it and not make it feel so intimidating. Because I hate the use of some of the cybersecurity terms that in myself, I'm guilty we use and they flow off our tongue like everybody out there understands it yet. Maybe the viewer or listener, were there deer in the headlights and what idiot talking about so I think it's important for us to talk at the right level and explain that you can take our time. And again, that was kind of the goal with senior cyber really to break it down, keep it easy and make it a light read. So they could start at a point and start using technology without the intimidation factor. Yeah.

1

Speaker 1

20:00

I have to say, too, as well written I, you were kind enough to send a copy out to me. I read it from head to tail. And it's very, very helpful. Oh, great. Yeah, it really is. Scott, when we look at search engines, there's a lot of them out there being Google a lot of names, people probably haven't even heard of what questions should we all ask when we're trying to make a decision on what search engine we should use?

2

Speaker 2

20:26

That's a great question. And I love search engines, powerful, unbelievable, and probably your listeners, use them throughout the day if you're on the internet. And what I always try to help people think about at least is make a conscious decision. It's not necessarily that we're doing things wrong. But what we enter in on a search engine, we have to realize is often sold to the highest bidder. So if I'm searching to buy a new kayak, and I type in on Google, you know, kayak, it's gonna bring up a whole bunch of different ads and things like that. But it's also going to take that information that I type into my browser, and it's going to sell it to multiple companies. In fact, this statistic I read not too long ago, was the average thing you type into your search engine goes to about 23 different companies, and they pay fractions of pennies for that information. But it's out there. And what does that mean? It means if you're also using other social media platforms, seniors tend to use Facebook a lot, you're going to start to notice more and more things targeting, you know, kayaks, if you were searching for kayak every time you get onto Facebook, and it slowly loads you live, whether you realize it or not into purchasing, because we know advertising works just like years ago on TV with TV commercials, they spend 10s of 1000s of dollars, people actually will buy it's been proven. Same thing. Now, with our smartphones and our computers, we're on a search engine entering that information, and it is not private, you have to assume it's being sold. Therefore, what do I recommend, mix it up a little bit. And I've even done some tests, even myself just to prove it to myself. And I'll pick something very obscure, and I'll put it into Google or Bing. And then over the weeks to come note how many times that pops up on different social media feeds that I have, or things that I get through email, on different computers, on my smartphone, so on and so forth. And what I recommend instead is consider something like Duck Duck go, there is a browser, that's pretty good. I think not as good as Google. But it's pretty darn good these days. And it doesn't push ads. And more importantly, it's not selling your personal information, what you type in on the search engine, that's what I think is really important. So people need to keep that in mind. Especially if it's things that are a little bit more private in nature, you don't want people targeting you. Or it may be somebody passed away in your family and you're doing research on funeral stuff, you want to suddenly be getting bombarded with every ad and everything related to funerals, funeral homes and graves of stones and caskets and so on. Now, you probably don't because they're going to do enough of that when things appear in the paper or on the internet with the posting. So just using balance and using some discernment there I think is really important. When using search engines.

1

Speaker 1

23:23

Scott, can you repeat the web browser? You suggested? Duck duck.com. Is that was that? Was that the name? Yeah,

2

Speaker 2

23:30

it's duck, duck. go.com. Got it. Okay. Yeah, yeah. And again, there's no cost to that. They're not taking any of your personal information to add to it. They're not sharing your IP address. In other words, where your computer is actually located, that you're typing in the terms that you're searching, and the data is actually encrypted. So you've got end to end encryption. So basically, you have a very secure means of searching information. None of those things are done properly when you use a generic thing, or Google will do bits and pieces and claim that it's secure. But in the end, they're selling your information. That's why they benefit from Right,

1

Speaker 1

24:12

right. Well, maybe you could expand on that a little bit more and talk about the pros and cons of surfing, browsing and performing searches. You've covered quite a bit of that now, but perhaps you can expand on that a little bit more, if you would.

2

Speaker 2

24:27

I think it's important when we think about browsing when we think about searching the worlds of the internet and the web is very open and it's a wonderful thing. It allows us to learn so many things. There's a great caution that I do put out there because it's also where cyber criminals love to prey on people. So when you go into any search engine and you put in a topic we have to be careful because what comes up under the search results may Maybe we've received your and we've taken a ball and we need to get a cane and you type in a cane. And all of a sudden, great articles come up and research and then suddenly we see a nice spot. Here's a new type of cane that's very useful. And if you click on that, some of those searches that pop up there in the search results are redirect to sites that are malicious sites. These are cybercriminals, that will set up sites. Now you go to the site, and it shows this latest and greatest cane and you think you're going to buy it, and you want to click on it. And you see it's a great price. If you see things that it's too good to be true, the price is super low, you know, it's $100 cane, but for now, it's only 1995. If you act now put your credit card and there's a sense of urgency to it. You've never heard of the name brand, it's not endorsed by AARP or something else that you trust. Use caution, talk to a friend, do a little more research, don't be too quick to press that Buy button. Why? Because it could be a hacker that's just trying to scan get your credit card, which is often the case, especially if you've never heard of the brand. Everybody's heard of AARP, they're a trusted well known brand. And they do endorse many products. So that's why I always try especially seniors use caution when buying things on the internet, because it's a haven for cyber criminals to get our personal information. And the same is true for trying to do online tax filing, our accountant may say, Oh, it's safe, and I'll file online. And you can do it online, yourself. And this. Use caution. Because there's so many scams out there tax scams and people pretending to be this person are working for the IRS. And all they're looking for is just little bits of pieces of information where they can take your filing your refund and have it redirected to another bank account. And you may not know it until months later. So be very, very leery of these type of scams and things done on the internet, especially a gas pump even. And that's what I recommend to people. That's what I do try to avoid using your credit card. anywhere that's unfamiliar as far as gas pumps are retail and same thing with ATMs don't go to a little kiosk ATM that you're not familiar with, probably gonna charge a $3 fee anyway, just to get your own money out, you're better off to go into the bank, take cash out, cash is king wherever you can. So you're not a victim of a credit card for

1

Speaker 1

27:23

Interesting. Interesting. I'm going to change things up a little bit. What would you go ahead? I'm sorry? No sound good. Okay. What would you suggest seniors do to educate themselves, all these new tech, new tech products that are coming out? I mean, it's almost I come from the tech industry, and I can't keep up with it. So what do you suggest?

2

Speaker 2

27:47

I think it's important for seniors to realize you don't have to have the latest and greatest technology to survive in this world. Everybody sells that to you in the industry tells you you need the latest iPhone, and you have to have the latest and greatest computer and the latest Wi Fi router. You really don't have to have it. In fact, in some ways, you're a little bit better off waiting. But anytime a product is newly introduced via smartphone, computer electronics, doesn't matter what it is, there's bugs in it. They've got security problems that have not been vetted out yet. So if you're an early adopter to technology, you're probably going to be more likely a victim of that technology. So it's okay if you're a little bit behind. I wouldn't think about it as being behind technology. But think about it that you're actually being a little more cyber savvy. So don't run out and buy the latest and greatest. As always, my advice wait till it's proven wait till the bugs get out. We told her, you know, the security patches are updated. We told the smartphone wait till it's been out for a year before you jump on the bandwagon and go try to buy it. Because it actually may keep you safer. And don't feel that intimidation and pressure by all your family members and everything else. And if it's too hard to operate a smartphone, and even one of the chapters I talked about, you can get a jitterbug, which is more cost effective means bigger buttons, bigger fonts easier to use, easier to see, there's nothing wrong with that. Don't feel that intimidation or pressure. That way. You could still embrace technology, enjoy it. But maybe it's not the latest and greatest.

1

Speaker 1

29:33

You know, that's a really good point because both my mother and my wife have a jitterbug. And it saved me with my mother in particular, because she was just having such a hard time with just a standard smartphone. So that's a very good suggestion. I agree with that just from experience that I'm seeing here. Now I'm going to go back. I'm going to go back to email. Okay, again, what's the best way for seniors to secure their email email from cyber crime.

2

Speaker 2

30:02

I think email is a tricky one. And one thing I like to share with people just so they could kind of think about it and make the best decision for themselves is probably they're not using Advanced Encryption with their email. They may not be sending a lot of personal information or sensitive information, but to some degree we all did. In other words, ask yourself this question. Have you ever emailed a password? through your email to a loved one? Have you ever emailed your social security number or bank account number? Any type of personal information? The answer is probably yes. Most people say no, at first. But when you really go through the list and ask yourself, you'll say Yeah, I do. Therefore, ask yourself, what email are you using? Is it a free hotmail free Yahoo, breach email? Or if it is, ask yourself the question, why is it free? Typically, it's because there's something traded for, for that free email, how do they make their money by selling your information by your content. Now, they're not necessarily saying, This is john smith, and I read an email, he's looking to buy a kayak again, it's example. But rather, it's called metadata data about data. So it's not going to say john smith, it's going to have a unique number that's associated with john smith, and then all the items associated to that number. That way, it allows these companies to kind of circumvent some of the privacy laws, and allows them to still sell information about information, that metadata about data that ties it directly to you. So therefore, we've got to keep that in mind, don't share personal information through your Gmail account. If you have a broadband provider, and you're paying them $20 $50 $100 a month for, you know, internet and you get an email account, more than likely that email is going to be encrypted. And it's going to be kept securely on a server and you will be safer. But regardless of what email program you use, try not to ever send password information, social security information, so on so forth, big because again, nothing is 100% secure, everything you'll notice, doesn't matter if it's government, energy tech companies. One by one, we're seeing what everybody is a victim of a cyber attack. And eventually our information gets out there. That information then is sold to the highest bidder on the dark web, which is kind of the internet's underbelly. We all work, mail, internet, everything else. On the surface level, we do a Google search. It's called the surface web that we're using a very small part of the Internet. The dark web is down below where it's not indexed, it's not easily searchable to find these unique websites. And they stay encrypted. They can jump around from different addresses the hard to find, and it's very hard for law enforcement to find these people. So when I look at email, I kind of backup and look at the bigger picture and focus on making sure I encourage people not share personal information or private information through my email communications. Make sure that you're cleaning your junk filters often get rid of that stuff and delete it. Don't hang on to email for years and years, I've been guilty of this. So what I've done is I take backups of my emails, and I've got about 400 plus 1000 emails right now that are disconnected from my computer on a backup. So if I have to access them ever disconnected from my computer, and more importantly, the Internet, and most importantly, away from cyber thieves, prying eyes.

1

Speaker 1

33:49

Excellent, excellent advice, because I'm guilty of that. I save everything, but I don't store it properly. You've just identified for me so great. I'm gonna talk about passwords. password, drive me crazy. And I'll tell you, I have a heck of a time remembering passwords. It's really a challenge for me. Can you help us by explaining what password protection is first? And what should we do to secure our e mail and remember our passwords?

2

Speaker 2

34:22

Yeah, yeah, this is, this is a subject that I love to hate. I always joke about I can't stand passwords yet. It's an integral part of my life, not just managing passwords, but also educating people on passwords in passwords have been around forever. And as long as they've been around, they've been compromised and hacked and really the main problem with passwords is people. People are creatures of habit, people have trouble remembering anything. More than seven or eight digits most of us struggle with whether or not we're senior or not, because it's repetitive. It's not tied to Any type of association, and our mind just can't remember them. Therefore, again, cybercriminals know this, and they're going to try to exploit that realize that people are going to try to use short passwords, passwords that are easy to remember. And that is a huge problem. So I always back up, and people will ask me, well, Scott, what's, what's the silver bullet? What do you do that solves a problem. There's no one silver bullet solution to everything. However, here's what I've done that helped put it in some perspective to help me manage it. Through my personal life and my business. I have, I've assessed my passwords, and I've got several 100 of them. And really secure passwords. When I'm accessing government websites, financial information, stock information, taxes, those would go down the old school, I write them in a little black book. But I don't stop there. Because many people write down their passwords in a book. And that's where every cyber security practitioner will yell and say, That's not safe. It's stupid this and that. And I agree, what you got to do with that black book is you got to secure layers of security, make sure things stay secure. So I have a little black book that I put in a state that's locked in a locked office in a lock building with alarms, and cameras, so and so forth. So layers of security, keep my password safe from my really secure passwords, or passwords that are more generic that I need to access remotely and often, that are not tapping into financial things, I will use what's called a password manager, I personally use dashlane, easy to use, affordable, works really well in my environment. And I think a lot of seniors may feel very comfortable with that. Because not hard to manage with a password manager, you need to know your one long, strong password to have access to all of your passwords, that information is encrypted. And it remains safe. So even if a hacker breaks into a server somewhere, that data remains encrypted, and it will take them hopefully hundreds of 1000s of years to decrypt and have access to all your passwords. So I think those things are really important. And the length of a password is extremely important. In other words, if it's five, six characters, that can be hacked in a matter of seconds. Once you get to 810 characters, it's going to take longer or 10 hours perhaps and then once you get up to 12 to 15, you're talking years and years before somebody could hack in, especially if you're using uppercase, lowercase symbols and numbers, where it basically means absolutely nothing to you or anybody else if it has any tidy you birthday dog name, mother's maiden name, high school, your favorite, you know, band that's easy to hack. And they call them oftentimes a dictionary attack where they'll actually take every common word in the dictionary and mix it up with all other variables till they could find it. So if you use a common name like car and your password, it's not secure. Because that can easily be compromised with automated tool, same thing about your your anything associated to you. Because hackers actually go out on social media, if you have a Facebook account and a Twitter account, LinkedIn account, your company's website, anything and everything about you, if you did a search on search engines, they take that information and put it in to try to hack and get from your passwords. So passwords are a huge, huge area that you want to focus on making them long and strong password manager or write them down to keep them secure. Some people come up with different phrases. And they take the first letter of each word of the last letter of each word and put that in, you can create your own system, but you got to maintain that kind of in your mind. So you can make sure that you can keep that consistent throughout all your passwords managing it can get overwhelming at times. So you got you got to use caution there. And the other big, big

2

Speaker 2

39:06

caution I put out there for passwords. And more than 50% of all people in the world of create passwords have a problem here is they reuse the same password across multiple login sites. In other words, if you created a password for Facebook account years ago, and your password was, you know, Big Daddy 123. And you can remember that password. Well when you sign up for a new bank bank XYZ and you put your name in john smith, and you put in your password and Big Daddy 123. Guess what if they compromised your Facebook account, there's again automated tools that hackers use. And that compromised password will actually be put into every common website that's out there for banking for stock information, social media sites, so if they get one your passwords and you reuse it across multiple things. You're going to hack into other accounts, once they get into your other account, they're going to change the password, take over your account, and start siphoning information stealing money from you take your credit cards down, steal your identity, whatever the case may be. So you see the danger. Never ever, ever reuse the same password across multiple logins. That's just a No, no. And it's a bad practice. Yet again, more than 50% of all users on the internet and computers, still to this day, do that. That's a problem.

1

Speaker 1

40:34

That's a big problem. Wow. I had no idea. That's very interesting. Now with your book, you include an online organizer, which I'm going to be using, which is a booklet very much like the black book you were just discussing. It's very helpful.

2

Speaker 2

40:51

Yeah. And I think what I did there, and I had painted in doing it at first, but the more seniors that I talked to, the more I saw a common problem, what was that? They want to take a piece of paper, they take a sticky note, innocently, they put it on their computer, they put it under their keyboard, they put it in the desk drawer, it's in a cabinet, it's in there safe. All of those are not good, maybe the safest, the safest, of course, but they can't manage them all in one spot and keep track of them. At least if you have a small little book that you write down the website when it was last updated the username, the password, security challenge questions and the answers to them. And you take that and now you've walked that somewhere safe, maybe the safety deposit box, a fire Safe at Home, something that will minimize the chance that we'll be getting compromised. You can keep your passwords 100 times more secure. But those sticky notes that are laying around everywhere, when a robber breaks into your house, they get over to a computer and they realize you're and you know, Florida on vacation, they have plenty of time to grab all the sticky notes and everything in any way about you physically. And then start compromising your put your password. So do what you can to try to manage them and take some level of control. And it will make a big difference in your life.

1

Speaker 1

42:10

Scott, can you repeat the the app that you mentioned earlier? for managing passwords?

2

Speaker 2

42:17

Yeah, absolutely. It's called dash lane. to ash lane calm. Yeah, yeah. And I always encourage people do your research PC Magazine does a great job every year. And they review all the different password managers. And every year I checked Ashley and is up there with some of the highest ratings. And one of the reasons that I gravitated myself toward them, because it is got a good balance between security and ease of use. And to me, that's always a nice balance. You always have to strike when you're making decisions about security, you have to be able to use it simple. For everyday things. If it's too complex, you're not you're not going to use you're going to gravitate back to sticky notes and scribble and passwords or reusing the same one. But if it's easy to manage and use, you're probably going to find it's going to be adopted in use and keep you safe at the same time.

1

Speaker 1

43:10

Got it perfect. Switching things up a little bit. Let's talk a little bit about biometric security. We're all hearing about this. What is bhaile metric security and how does it fit into the picture?

2

Speaker 2

43:26

Yeah, biometric security is very interesting. And maybe I'll approach it this way in describing it. We just talked about passwords and how important they are. And oftentimes when we log into something, we have a username. And then we have a password that uniquely will identify and validated will authenticate. Yes, this is Scott shover logging in, it's not somebody else. biometrics really allow for another authenticator, and I liken it often to what's called multi factor authentication in many of us. If you do online banking, maybe as an example, you'll again enter your username, you'll enter your password, and then you'll have a nother entry. And it may be that the bank send you a text. And it's a six digit code that you put in that's a another form of authenticating because they know that you are you but you also have a smartphone that it was texted and high probability that that smartphone is your smartphone, and you have a passcode on that smartphone. So only you have access to that number that you can now enter in and it's a one time code that will then disappear. So each time it's unique for you logging into their bank. So multi factor authentication, I highly recommend you use if you're accessing anything that has level of security, especially as we talked about earlier, some of these green emails, Gmail and Yahoo Mail they actually offer multi factor authentication. So if you are using that it gives it another degree of security so So it's very important that we at least consider that I think. And I think when you do learn how to use it, it becomes much easier at first, it could be very daunting use another layer of security and an economical, find my smartphone and all these other things. But again, once you start to adopt it, and implement it, you feel much more secure. And in reality, you are much more secure. So I think it's important to kind of think, think about adding slowly adding layers of security in and that way your digital footprint will continue to be stronger, you won't be a victim of a cyber attack.

1

Speaker 1

45:41

Okay, great, good stuff. Now, going back to terminology, we hear about spam all the time. What is spam?

2

Speaker 2

45:52

Spam is kind of fascinating. It actually, many of us may be seniors will appreciate this. Even more, I think it was from war time, there was a metal cam that actually had can meat in it. That was ham, and it got coined spam. And there's different theories on it. But a lot of the theories say that came out of a Monty Python, kind of a spoof that they played on spam, spam spam across the screen. And there's some other stories I've heard as well. But But Spam is really the ability to take whatever it is in email, and just put it out to the math is so a cybercriminal could try to sell something, and they put it into an email and they hit a button, and it literally sends it out to millions of computers, millions of email addresses at the same time. Most of its what maybe I like and we could all relate to as if when you go in your mailbox, what percentage of the mail is real mail that's addressed to you, right, as opposed to junk mail that we have to shred and throw out. Same thing with spam spam, for the most part, it's just email that's put out there by the millions. Without knowing the recipient, all they want to do is hope that the recipient of it will click on an attachment as we talked about a phishing email. Or they'll actually click on something, go to a website and buy some product or service or something like that. So it's very dangerous, because it's so easy to put in the users hands. If somebody sends me a spam email, I open my smartphone checking email, it's right in front of me. If they try to call me on the phone, I'm probably not going to pick up the phone and answer it. So it allows cyber criminals to get right in front of their targeted audience to try to exploit whatever they can, at the lowest possible cost. It's very, very cheap to send out millions and millions of spam emails these days. And unfortunately, the spam filters to stop this junk email, they work but they don't work well enough, because look how many emails get through. As I mentioned before, over 80,000 people click on phishing emails each and every day, that tells me it got through the server that your broadband provider has their filter, it got through your junk filter, your spam filter, any anti malware and antivirus software that you have running on your computer to get to your inbox. So it's pretty effective that they could cool it. And that's I think, where the grave concern is. So if you have a lot of emails, I get a little more than 1000 emails per day and then manage for email accounts. It's a little bit overwhelming. So I have layers of filtering going in there to help pull out and probably 800 plus of those emails are just that junk spam soliciting me trying to get me to sign up for something, or in between that all the scams and things that are trying to get me to click on these phishing scams in there. So having some good filtering in place and learning and being discerning is important. And also unsubscribing for stuff that you don't use. That's important people sometimes forget about that. You signed up for a newsletter from XYZ company for something you were interested but that was 10 years ago, you're not interested in that anymore. unsubscribe from it, and then it will fill your email box which is garbage. I know move with my grandfather. He loved to receive mail and he loved to receive emails, they spent several hours per day combing through it part in part. It's something to do it makes you feel important, but at the same time, it lowers you in two different scams and it was victimized three or four times as a result. Phone scams, email scams, credit card scams through email. So want to use caution. There

1

Speaker 1

49:47

were so many stories in the news about hacking and security breaches. Who can we trust?

2

Speaker 2

49:54

Unfortunately, from my perspective, I always share with audiences you cannot trust any You want and that sounds sad. Now, does that mean you can't trust your own family members? Well, of course you can trust your own family members and loved ones. However, I say that so you think about this, how do you know that you're, that they are your family or your loved ones? Many of the scams where they socially engineer and fool people out of their money out of their credential, they pose as somebody that knows you and loves you. Hey, this is Grandpa, how are you doing there? Next thing you know, you give in to the scam. And it's really not grandpa's the cybercriminal. There's a lot of spoofing where they could spoof an email, they could spoof a phone number, so it appears that it's your bank. And I've had this distance before, hey, this is bank XYZ, I'm from the fraud department. Mr. showbie, your card may have been compromised. I'm here to make sure that we secure your account before you lose any money. I look on my phone and I see Oh, it's got my bank name on it. The person sounded official. They say all the right terms. They sound very convincing. They even share the last four digits, your account are 1234. Mr. shover? Is that correct? Yeah. Why? Well, let me just confirm your social security number and your current address just to make sure so that way, we could stop all these transactions. So they sound authoritative. They have little bits and pieces of information that make me believe that they're legit. But guess what, they're complete fraudsters. So a lot of caution has to be has to be put out there. Because cyber criminals are constantly using these different means to fool us out of information. So from the trust side, I still tend to trust no one. What can you do if you get a phone call like that? Before you do anything else? And I've tried this, I said, Oh, hold on a second, sir. Just in case we get disconnected? Can I get your name again and your phone number? And guess what, if it's a scammer, nine out of 10 times, they hang up the phone conversation over, that tells you right there, they don't want to divulge any information about themselves. So don't be put always on the defensive, put them on the defensive, you know, be be a little more offensive and put some information in front of them that they have to confirm their credentials who they are. And that will tell you quickly whether or not they're legitimate or not. And still don't give away any information. call a friend, call the bank directly. Call your your trusted son or daughter, hey, somebody was asking about this? Is this a scam? Is it real? And that usually will will ferret out the bad guys from the good guys.

1

Speaker 1

52:35

Good stuff. Now, what can you tell us generally about the security business that would help us all understand the need for regulation, especially as everything we're hearing about big tech right now? I mean, it seems to be in the news every single day.

2

Speaker 2

52:51

Yeah, I'm unfortunate. I'm not a huge fan of regulation. However, we all realize there needs to be a degree of it. So there's some culpability. And so there's some discipline for those that are not following the rules. And it's really a fine line, unfortunately. And even the Biden administration recently put forth some, some rules and regulations are trying to put in place to really hold different countries COBOL for some of the cybercrime, especially a lot of the ransomware that's been rampant around the globe, and it used to be, you know, hundreds of dollars that were taken in ransom, then it migrated 10s of 1000s to hundreds of 1000s. Now we're talking many times, millions of dollars are being extorted a recent case, there was a $40 million ransomware paid out through an insurance company on behalf of an undisclosed company. What does that tell you, the ante is going up, up, up. And they're making more and more money, which allows them to grow the criminal empire and now they've taken ransomware to the next level, where they're also having a double punch where they do extortion, they not only will take your computer's data encrypted, and hold the key in front of you dangling and saying, Hey, I'm not going to give you a means to decrypt your data. So you have no access to anything on your computer. But also they download that data. And they extort you. So if you don't pay the ransom, then they say Well guess what? All your personal data now I'm going to put it out for the public on the dark web, and anybody can have access to it. And now suddenly, your mind starts spinning and saying oh, now on my computer, I have my tax documents and I have my banking information and my I stored my passwords on there. And now the whole the whole thing about your person is out there your whole privacy or your whole digital footprint is out there for somebody to now take and perform other hacks on identity theft and the list the list goes on and on. So the world has certainly changed and we have to be very aware of where we store our data, what we store, and how easily it can be compromised, in a matter of seconds by a cyber criminal.

1

Speaker 1

55:09

You've been talking about ransomware. What the heck is ransomware? What can we do to protect ourselves from it?

2

Speaker 2

55:18

ransomware is really a strain of what I mentioned earlier malware, malicious software, and cyber thieves got crafty. And they said, instead of just causing havoc in yours back, a computer crashed with a worm or malware or some type of virus, causing you grief and you'd have to clean things often reinstall your operating system, so on and so forth. So it went from an aggravation to ransomware is just like one would think if somebody took your child as hostage, and they held a ransom. And they said, hey, you're not going to get your child back until you pay me $100,000. That's in essence, what cyber criminals are doing. But what they do is, and it's usually orchestrated through a phishing email that we talked about earlier, you click on something in a phishing email, a particular strain of malware is downloaded this type of ransomware and it goes through your computer and encrypts every single file on your computer, and it pops a note up and it says you've been, you know, attacked, and your computer's being held hostage or being held ransom, unless you pay us And typically, the payout is not in US dollars. It's in cryptocurrency, typically Bitcoin, which is a digital currency, that allows a level of anonymity that the cyber criminals will use. So you can't trace it back to them. They want to be paid in cryptocurrency in Bitcoin, so they can't be caught. And they'll typically say, Hey, give me you know, five Bitcoin or X number of Bitcoin, you got to figure out how do I get Bitcoin and go to a Bitcoin exchange in the bank and get converted and send it to them. So it's a stressful painful process. Companies typically have cybersecurity insurance and insurance companies come in, they'll negotiate it, they'll pay the ransom, if it's so decided, and negotiate that $100,000 down to $20,000. And pay the cyber criminal that. So ransomware is really a nasty thing. Because you're dealing with criminals, you have no guarantee that that cyber criminal when they receive your $20,000 payout, and Bitcoin is going to now hand over the keys to decrypt the files to give you access back to your computer. And once you pay the ransom, you get put on the suckers list. In other words, other cyber criminals are now going to start targeting you again and again, because they say, Oh, this person's in easy pay out there, they pay the ransom, let's go after him, but a higher fee this time, so it's really bad to pay the ransom, there are extenuating circumstances, if a hospital is victimized, and the hospital shut down, now they can't handle any, any patients at the ER that could potentially die. And there's been people now that had been that have actually died as a result of a ransomware cyber attack on the hospital. Because the hospital could not perform the necessary duties to the patient to save their life, because their computer systems are down and they didn't have access to their medical records. And a lot of the medical equipment now is tied into the internet and tied in wireless, when that's all shut off. They can't function as a hospital and they turn patients away. And the ambulance turns around and rushes into another hospital. And now they've passed away because they couldn't perform the necessary treatment. So it's really a nasty thing. And there's even been a kind of code of honor amongst some of the cyber criminals where they'll they'll claim, hey, we don't target hospitals, or the health care industry where people's lives are alive. We just want our money. So there's some legitimate cyber criminals, supposedly, but I think all cyber criminals are bad, and they shouldn't be paid the ransom, if you don't have to pay the ransom, because it just emboldens the criminals to grow their criminal empire and perform more and more advanced cyber attacks.

1

Speaker 1

59:13

On unbelievable. You write about avoiding the con and confidence in your book, what do you mean by that?

2

Speaker 2

59:24

Well, we have to really be cautious, because again, I talked a little bit earlier about social engineering and social engineering is such a problem because a lot of these con artists will fool us and dupe us they will use familiar terms that we might feel comfortable with. And I think that's really what we have to be careful. If you get a call that it's a person picking up the phone they're calling you but they sound very convincing, but they're really a con man. They're using terms Maybe they claim, hey, I'm from AARP and I see you've got your your current card and your membership there, we just want to update it. And for only $99, we're gonna have this special bonus for you. But overall, it sounds convincing. They take their time they use the familiar terms, maybe that somebody would use at AARP talking to a senior. And that does what it allows you to kind of lower your guard trust in the person. And then they use it to their advantage to get siphoned information out from you, usually personal information. And that's why we want to be so cautious there. And there's different types of targeted attacks that they're even now using. We talked about phishing. And I think that's one of the most common things, but that's sent out to the general public via spam just blanket emails and whoever opens it. But now what's happening is the spear phishing attacks, again, I talked about, maybe it's a senior in assisted living. And they obtained somehow, the list of everybody, every seniors email address, and 1000 seniors, perhaps, now they do a spear phishing attack, which is much more focused, targeted attack to an individual, where they're still sending fraudulent emails. But again, it appears to be a very known trusted source, a family member, a group or organization that they're from. And it will really fool somebody, because if they don't suspect it, it looks so convincing. So there's different layers of levels of attack. So that's where we really got to be careful. And that's where that word con, kind of fools you. It's a con artist that fools you with these different layers to make it super convincing. And that's what's happening more and more bs focused attacks that fool older individuals and seniors out of their money out of their personal information. And that's where I think for myself, it really annoys me, because not enough is being done from an education side. So for family members, take the time, if you're a caregiver, talk to your senior share some of the basic cybersecurity, precautionary information, they're the best practices that they can implement, and open that line of communication. So if they feel uncertain about something, before they click, before they give away any information on the phone, or through the mail, or whatever means that they talk to you first, and that can go a long way in keeping your loved one safe.

1

Speaker 1

1:02:35

Right, right. And Senior cyber, you talk about preparing for the worse. Can you expand on that for us?

2

Speaker 2

1:02:46

Yeah, absolutely. And I think when we think about seniors, sometimes it can get a little bit difficult to actually sit down and have some of the conversations with your aging parents or your grandparents. But I think it's extremely important that we actually do why because hackers are not going to go after us just when we're alive and just our grandparents or parents, they're also going to try to target us for any weaknesses that we have. In other words, they could try to perform medical fraud compromise our medical records, and then suddenly, they could be collecting money for procedures and things that are filed through our health care, that really were not performed. Those types of things are very common. And then you have to think ahead to as we get older, what do we have, we probably have a nest egg, maybe we have a 401k. Or maybe we have stocks and things. The family members need to sit down and discuss and understand things that are hard to talk about sometimes wills, trusts, retirement things, how secure is that information? How do we keep it more secure? out? What are the passwords to access that? And are they stored on a password manager? Are they locked in a safety deposit box in the bank if grandma grandpa or mom or dad suddenly passes away, those type of things, I think are important cyber discussions that will allow us, to your point prepare for the worst when somebody passes, or when somebody is going to be a victim of a cyber crime that we could respond and help our loved one. And that's I think, very, very important that you almost assume you're going to be a victim at some point. And if you prepare now, and get your cyber things in order, just like you try to get your financial things in order somebody ages and only have so much time left on this or you'll keep yourself safe but also your loved ones that inherit some of this and I've heard of many horror stories, where in age grandparents Unfortunately passes unexpectedly. And it's left a cyber mess for the survivors, the family, they struggle and say, Well, I don't have passwords to this account. And I don't know the security challenge questions that grandpa used here, so I can't access it. Because now you're dealing with lots of different agencies be at the Social Security, IRS, Medicaid, Medicare, dealing with funeral home, there's so many different things that happened in such a short period of time, you need to kind of prepare for the worst right now, especially from the standpoint of cybersecurity.

1

Speaker 1

1:05:39

Interesting, Scott, I'd like to open up the mic to you just to have you go ahead and just discuss what you think is really important to seniors when it comes to cybersecurity.

2

Speaker 2

1:05:52

I think what standard stands out in my mind, especially after all the research and writing this book, and I still continue to talk to seniors. And I think it's very important for seniors to realize they don't have to be afraid. They don't have to be intimidated with the internet, with technology. And they don't have to feel like they can't talk about it. They're not alone, they're not an island, I hope that they can be empowered to use technology for good. And that they could just apply the common sense and wisdom that seniors have accumulated a, you know, a lifetime worth of experience and wisdom that they have, if they apply that to the use of technology, they will stay safe, and they can enjoy it. And they can enjoy hopefully, their retirement, and really experience all the benefits technology has. And they can make it really hard for cyber criminals, there's nothing we can do to stop them. 100%. But to me, if we work together, and we educate and empower seniors, and share best practices with them, it'll really make it hard for the cyber criminals, they'll have to chip away and work extra hard just to take every penny they can from all of us. So I think the key is sharing this knowledge and sharing best practices and working together will make a big, big difference.

1

Speaker 1

1:07:18

Fantastic. You know, your books, seeing your cyber arrived in the mail in this beautiful gold foil packaging. I opened it assuming that I would be getting a paper book book, which I had anxiously been waiting for. I opened the package up. And I was really surprised I found the book, I found the online organizer, which we talked a little bit about earlier. And I also found the senior cyber activity book and booklet crayons as well. I love this by the way, my grandson is coming over on Saturday, and we're going to sit down and play with us. Please tell us Yeah, please tell us about this package that I received and the goodies that are in there.

2

Speaker 2

1:08:04

Yeah, I tend to like to not just a lot of people sell books. And for me, it's Yeah, I love to sell books, we all do. And we have to pay for some of this. But more importantly, I'm trying to hopefully create an experience where seniors will feel comfortable. And where they can, as mentioned earlier, feel comfortable with terms, that tech jargon. And it becomes a learning experience. That's fun. And as you point I'm happy to hear you say you have a grandson coming over family members. You take the crayons out and in the activity book, the color and some things, you do a word search, you do a puzzle, you do a game, those type of things are hopefully going to stimulate the conversation, quality time that parents, grandparents, grandchildren can spend together, which is really the most important thing I think, yeah, but then also sharing some some best practices, sharing some stories, sharing some wisdom things maybe that somebody learned maybe a senior tip that they've learned, I try to share them generously throughout the book to keep them simple rememberable and then tie that into the activity book there. And if anybody wants an activity book, they could certainly just reach out there, go to my website, Scott shover calm and just shoot me an email through the form there. And I'll be happy to mail you some some crayons and activity book. There's no charge there. And that way you can feel comfortable and enjoy some of the things in the world of cyber Nashville, that intimidation factor. Scott, is that website The best way to get ahold of you? Yeah, absolutely. And it's just my name's Scott chauffeur.com. And on there, there are numerous tips that I share. There's videos I've done more than 1000 interviews that are out there. You could watch any, you know, post any of that. And I share information about my books and some sample chat. And clips and the different events that I'm at, and that I speak at and work with other cybersecurity experts that I'm constantly learning from. So it's really a wealth of cyber related information that hopefully my audience can use and benefit from. I also have a actual live radio show that I'm part of on cyber crime radio every single day, I hit the headlines in the morning. And that airs throughout the day. And there's also a weekend segment that I do as well. And also a segment on three questions that I'm kind of posed with each week that comes out. And I share cyber tips again on the radio, and it's on cyber crime radio. So encourage people take a moment just to listen into that myself and many other cyber experts. They're trying to educate the public so we can win this battle against cyber criminals.

1

Speaker 1

1:10:53

Fantastic. Folks, Scott's books are all available on his website, as he mentioned, you can also go to www seniors 50 to 120 dot com and pick up his books as well. Scott, this has been wonderful. I have learned a lot and I'm sure that the listeners will learn a lot from this as well. I know you are extremely busy and to take this much time out of your busy schedule is very much appreciated.

2

Speaker 2

1:11:21

Oh, thank you. It was my honor. And Mark, I want to thank you for all you do in educating and encouraging all the seniors out there. I greatly appreciate your valuable resource. Well, thank you. I appreciate that as well.